fashion

Reconciling tradition with modernity on day three

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Varun Bahl

For his digital showcase, the designer derived inspiration from nature and called his collection Bloom. Crafted in his signature colour palette of blacks, reds, bottle green, dusty pink, and ivory, the ensembles exuded an inherent earthiness juxtaposed with the brand’s signature artistry of surface embellishments.

 

Tarun Tahiliani

The designer pondered over the current pandemic and came up with The Age of Innocence collection, best suited for the modern-day bride and groom. The post-pandemic bride looks for freedom, hope and happiness and perhaps a new sense of luxury. Realised in hues of Minakari which include aqua, pinks, jades and tea roses with recontextualising of Jamevars, the pieces exuded TT’s characteristic regalia.

 

Neeta Lulla

The collection titled She Universe had all the escapist shine-on antidote in the form of Grecian sari gowns and sequinned cocktail dresses. The form-flattering silhouettes and masterful use of surface embellishments made the collection sparkle with all its might. The designer also kept weightlessness in mind when it came to her ensembles.

 

Abhishek Gupta

Titled Benares, designer Abhishek Gupta’s collection used applique work, pleats and intricate thread embroidery lending gravitas to the lehengas and sherwanis. The use of brocade in sherwanis made it more luxurious, adding to the richness of the collection. All in all, there was ample wedding style inspiration for both the bride and the groom.

 

Gaya

Botanical and floral prints were injected in the design house’s debut loungewear offering. This digital film featured ensembles for different settings – from chic gymwear to comfy sleepwear to pieces for a laidback poolside party. It depicted different scenarios in beautiful settings to redefine resort wear. Bomber and track sets, sweatshirts, pyjama sets, robes, kaftans, camisoles and T-shirts were teamed with visor caps and headbands.

 

Naturally Anuradha

Rooted in sustainability, this fashion film featured models strutting in saris against the backdrop of a loom factory. Endi silk, Muga Silk, Nuni Silk, spun silk and cotton fabrics were used to make ensembles that are 100% vegetable dyed using materials such as turmeric, lac, iron, harda, manjishta etc. The collection was minimalistic with subtle use of colours.

 

Rimi Nayak India

The film started by highlighting feelings we’ve faced due to Covid-19. But the collection celebrated fighting back, leaving behind the gloom. Tropical prints took over as they were seen in dresses, jumpsuits, saris, and ‘90s style headbands.

 

Niki Mahajan

The designer’s collection titled Under The Midnight Sky featured saris, lehengas and shararas embellished with rich mirror, aari and zardozi work. Drawing from the city of Lucknow, her master craftsmen worked with silver metal wire to create delicate patterns. With hues of the midnight sky, this line was reminiscent of bygone eras.

 

Ashima Leena

This collection was a tribute to the skilled craftsmen and weavers, who have struggled and faced various challenges in these gloomy times. Applique work on brocade, French knots and zardozi embroidery was seen on traditional Indian silhouettes perfect for a bride-to-be.



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